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Tim Enloe

Traditional Logic: 8th Grade

Following up on our Pre-Logic Colloquium for 7th grade, this Traditional Logic course  focuses on the “bread and butter” of classical logic, the argument form of the syllogism.  Presented in the context of a Christian theory of knowledge, the course explains, examines, and gives much practice with the varieties of logical statements, preparing students to engage […]

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Classical Writing – 8th Grade

Like its predecessor, Classical Writing – 7th Grade, this course continues to prepare students for more advanced study of Rhetoric in high school.   By using the classical progymmasmata writing exercises, the course teaches students how to reason their way through a given topic, to treat it thoroughly from multiple angles, and to express their thoughts with […]

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Classical Writing – 7th Grade

This course aims to begin preparing students for more advanced study of Rhetoric in high school.   By using the classical progymmasmata writing exercises, the course teaches students how to reason their way through a given topic, to treat it thoroughly from multiple angles, and to express their thoughts with increasing precision and winsomeness in order […]

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Pre-Logic Colloquium

This course is designed to fill what I have long perceived as a gap in many programs of classical Christian education: namely, the need for a course that offers Middle School students a chance to transition gradually into what some call the “Logic Stage” of education. Students between 12-14 years of age transition to this […]

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Aeschylus’ Oresteia

Is human life controlled inevitably and solely by the divine will, or does a man’s innate character in some significant, perhaps even knowable, manner contribute to creating his own destiny? Do the sins of the fathers really pursue subsequent generations, wreaking havoc upon them, or is this idea an excuse that an unvirtuous man tries […]

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Sophocles’ Oedipus Trilogy

What is the relationship of politics and religion?  Does the welfare of the city have any substantial claim on a man’s life and destiny?  Is the city perhaps itself a sort of incursion of the divine into otherwise mundane human life?   Are there laws above the ones man makes, and if so, how can we […]

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The Reformation of the 11th Century

Long before the Protestant Reformers announced the theme of post tenebras, lux – “after darkness, light” – to describe their work of reforming the Church, another great reformation shook the foundations of Christendom and resulted in sweeping changes for both Church and culture.  This was the Gregorian Reform of the 11th century, spearheaded by the imposing, fiery […]

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Late Antique Christianity

The historical period now known as “Late Antiquity” carves out three centuries from the old “Ancient” category and a century and a half from the old “Medieval” category.  Late Antiquity thus claims for itself a swath of time from about the 150s A.D. to the 650s A.D. During Late Antiquity, the Mediterranean world as it […]

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Thucydides: On Justice and Power

Of his account of the great Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta, Thucydides wrote, “I have not written this as an essay to win momentary applause, but as a possession for all time.”  The story he tells of this seemingly provincial war is meant to highlight universal themes so as to serve as a storehouse […]

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